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Rare Dalmatian Pelican Chicks Being Hand-Raised at San Diego Zoo’s Avian Propagation Center

An 11-day-old Dalmatian pelican chick gobbles its morning meal of fish at the San Diego Zoo’s Avian Propagation Center.

An 11-day-old Dalmatian pelican chick gobbles its morning meal of fish at the San Diego Zoo’s Avian Propagation Center.

The Avian Propagation Center at the San Diego Zoo has two new residents, a pair of Dalmatian pelicans—11 and 2 days old. The pair arrived at the Zoo from the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, after their parents were unable to raise them upon hatching. Animal care staff at the Zoo’s off-exhibit Avian Propagation Center will hand-raise the birds for approximately 50 to 60 days, until they are strong enough to return to their flock at the Safari Park. The pelican chicks grow rapidly and should be covered in their downy feathers by three to four weeks of age.

The Dalmatian pelican chicks are part of the first North American breeding program for this vulnerable species. Since the breeding program was started in 2006, 34 chicks have been hatched. Because of the success, the Safari Park has sent some of the birds to the Phoenix Zoo, where a second breeding colony is being established.

Dalmatian pelicans are one of the rarest pelican species in the world and the largest of the pelican species. When they fledge at approximately six to seven months, the birds could measure five to six feet in length and have a wingspan of nine to 11 feet. Dalmatian pelicans live and nest in freshwater wetlands and rivers throughout Europe and Asia and have gone extinct in some of their native regions. The loss of numbers is due to damage of the delicate wetland habitats that they rely on for breeding and raising chicks.

Fish is the primary diet for the Dalmatian pelican, and they often must compete for food with fishing enterprises. In certain areas, they are hunted as a food source and for their bills, which herders use to comb horses.

Guests at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park can see Dalmatian pelicans in the middle of the large pond in the South African exhibit when they take the African Tram Safari.

Bringing species back from the brink of extinction is the goal of San Diego Zoo Global. As a leader in conservation, the work of San Diego Zoo Global includes onsite wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, as well as international field programs on six continents. The work of these entities is inspiring children through the San Diego Zoo Kids network, reaching out through the Internet and in children’s hospitals nationwide. The work of San Diego Zoo Global is made possible by the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy and is supported in part by the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global.

Photo taken on March 17, 2015 by Tammy Spratt, San Diego Zoo

CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PUBLIC RELATIONS, 619-685-3291
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Transparency Leads to High Rating for San Diego Zoo Global Fiscal Management

Global_logo_color webFor the third year in a row San Diego Zoo Global has earned a four-star rating from Charity Navigator for its fiscal management and commitment to accountability. A three-year, four-star rating is achieved by only 12 percent of the 8,000 organizations surveyed. The rating system serves as a guide offering information for philanthropy.

“We are proud to be a trusted destination for conservation philanthropy,” said Douglas G. Myers, president and CEO of San Diego Zoo Global. “We work hard to ensure that money raised for our mission goes immediately into the important work saving species from extinction.”

Over the last three years San Diego Zoo Global has committed more than $500 million for animal care, exhibits, education programs and conservation initiatives. Significant programs include its ongoing work to recover the California condor, head-starting and reintroduction programs for Caribbean iguanas, contribution to knowledge about giant pandas and support for fieldwork on six continents.

Charity Navigator works to help charitable givers make intelligent giving decisions by providing information on more than 8,000 charities nationwide and by evaluating their financial health. It calculates each charity’s score based upon several broad criteria, including how much is spent per dollar raised, what percentage of funds goes to programs vs. administrative and fund-raising expenses, and the organization’s long-term financial health. It then assigns a rating from one to four, with four being the best rating. San Diego Zoo Global has received a four-star rating through this system seven times in the last eight years.

Bringing species back from the brink of extinction is the goal of San Diego Zoo Global. As a leader in conservation, the work of San Diego Zoo Global includes onsite wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, as well as international field programs on six continents. The work of these entities is inspiring children through the San Diego Zoo Kids network, reaching out through the Internet and in children’s hospitals nationwide. The work of San Diego Zoo Global is made possible by the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy and is supported in part by the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global.

CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PUBLIC RELATIONS, 619-685-3291
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19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

Because Butterfly Jungle is back at the Safari Park…

1. Butterflies taste with their feet.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

2. A group of butterflies is sometimes called a flutter.

A group of butterflies is sometimes called a flutter. 19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

3. Their eyes are made of 6,000 lenses and can see ultraviolet light.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

4. There are 165,000 known species of butterflies found on every continent except Antarctica.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

5. Many adult butterflies never excrete waste – they use up all they eat for energy.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

6. Despite popular belief, butterfly wings are clear – the colors and patterns we see are made by the reflection of the tiny scales covering them.

A group of butterflies is sometimes called a flutter. 19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

7. Butterfly wings move in a figure “8” motion.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

8. Butterflies vary in size – the largest species may reach 12 inches across, while the smallest may only be half an inch.

A group of butterflies is sometimes called a flutter. 19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

9. Some butterfly species lay their eggs on only one type of plant.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

10. The Very Hungry Caterpillar was no joke – the first meal after a caterpillar hatches is usually the eggshell from which it has just emerged.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

11. In some areas, the number of feeding caterpillars on plants is so great that you can actually hear them munching. Thus, manners are not important in butterfly society.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

12. The process by which a caterpillar magically transforms into a butterfly, aka metamorphosis, is completed in 10 to 15 days, depending on the species.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

13. Butterflies are essentially cold-blooded.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

14. Skipper butterflies fly so fast they could outpace a horse, but most butterflies fly at 5 to 12 miles per hour (8 to 20 kilometers per hour).

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

15. Butterflies have a long, tube-like tongue called a proboscis that allows them to soak up their food rather than sip it.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

16. Males drink from mud puddles to extract minerals that aren’t available in flowers. This behavior is known as “puddling.”

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

17. “Puddle clubs” are groups of butterflies that gather at wet soil to suck up salts and minerals.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

18. Some butterflies have been seen drinking blood from open wounds on animals.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

19. Scientists thought butterflies were deaf until the first butterfly ears were identified in 1912.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

Join the conversation: Do you have any butterfly facts to add to this list? Share them in the comments.

 

Jenn Beening is the social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. Read her previous post, 13 Animals Grumpier Than Grumpy Cat.

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Best of Vine

Do you follow the San Diego Zoo on Vine? If not, you’re missing out on a ridiculous amount of cute. Enjoy this recap of the Zoo’s best Vines ever.

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matt Steele is senior social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. Read his previous post, 17 Real Life Angry Birds.

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17 Real Life Angry Birds

While birds don’t feel emotion like we do, it sure seems like they do sometimes. If birds could feel human emotion, these would be the angriest.

This Guinea fowl is really not amused. 10831777_729309523832666_235296020_n

This secretary bird is tired of your lame secretary jokes.

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This flamingo is wondering what you’re looking at. 7705008540_0e704f0708_z

 

This secretary bird needs you to get off his lawn. 8497763573_f11afdfdea_z

 

This metallic starling is the original goth. All life is black (sigh)…10872535643_7ae2db3ed4_z

 

 

This burrowing owl just can’t believe it.

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Neither can this burrowing owl. Burrowingowl

 

This California condor is clearly plotting world domination. Condor2

 

You’ve got to be kidding this fairy bluebird. fairy bluebird

This kingfisher doesn’t want to have to tell you again.

Kingfisher-IonMoe

Photo by Ion Moe

 

This ornate eagle hawk kind of wants to have you for dinner.

ornate eagle hawk deric wagner

Photo by Deric Wagner

 

Nothing to see here, carrion. Ruppell's vulture

This scarlet macaw thought he had seen it all.

Scarlet macaw deric wagner

Photo by Deric Wagner

 

This Steller’s sea eagle is about to lose it. Steller's sea eagle

This secretary bird really, really needs anger management classes.

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Photo by Veronique Aubois-Mann

 

This white-naped crane is the opposite of impressed. Indian sarus crane

 

This white-necked raven needs you to pipe down, or else…white-necked raven

 

Matt Steele is senior social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. Read his previous post, 13 Animal Phobias for Friday the 13th.

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13 Animals Grumpier Than Grumpy Cat

Because Tardar Sauce isn’t the only one with grouchy facial expressions…

This mountain lion is ready to pick a fight.

Cougar

photo: Darrell Ybarrondo

And this tiger wants your kid to stop tapping on the glass.

Tiger

photo: Ion Moe

Benzy the honey badger just doesn’t care.

Honeybadger

And guess what? This lemur is not impressed with your fancy camera lens.

Lemur

photo: Ion Moe

Did they seriously just call me a bear? Ugh.

Koala

Don’t these hairless primates know it’s rude to point and stare? Lettuce eat.

Gorillas

photo: Helene Hoffman

This vulture chick doesn’t care about Internet stardom.

Rueppell's vulture chick

And Nindiri has the grumpy cat look down.

Jaguar

photo: Mollie Rivera

But this white-faced saki owns it.

White-faced saki

No feline is more upset than Oshana trying to raise four cubs.

Lion

photo: Bob Worthington

Except maybe this cougar.

Cougar

photo: Craig Chaddock

This is a capuchin’s “happy face.”

Capuchin monkey

And this lion-tailed macaque is smiling for the camera… j/k.

Lion-tailed macaque

Jenn Beening is the social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. Read her previous post, 9 Exotic Mating Rituals of the Animal Kingdom.

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13 Animal Phobias for Friday the 13th

What better day than Friday the 13th to talk about animal phobias? While many phobias play an important evolutionary role, some…not so much. With that said, here are 13 of the most common animal phobias.

Zoophobia – Fear of animals

Being Zoo folks, we clearly don’t understand this one. Like, not even a little.

Ailurophobia – Fear of cats

We all know the silly superstitions surrounding black cats, but some people fear all cats. Even Mr. Snookums the house cat.

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Apiphobia – Fear of bees

While bees are incredibly important pollinators, it’s important to have a healthy respect for those stingers.

Photo by Savanna Kiefer

Photo by Savanna Kiefer

 

Arachnaphobia – Fear of spiders

This is perhaps one of the most common phobias. Spiders do occasionally bite (rarely causing serious harm), but are actually good to have around because they help control the insect population.

Chiroptophobia – Fear of bats

Bats are great pest control and rarely bite humans. And how could you fear this face?

Entomophobia – Fear of insects

Sure, insects may seem strange to us mammals, but they’re actually a vital part of our planet. Without them, all life would cease to exist.

Herpetophobia – Fear of reptiles

For the record, reptiles are NOT slimy. Their scales are dry, smooth and gorgeous.

Mottephobia – Fear of butterflies

If you have this, you probably shouldn’t come to the Safari Park’s annual Butterfly Jungle event. Just sayin’.

Ornithophobia – Fear of birds

We think birds are pretty awesome, but clearly some people don’t. Hitchcock didn’t help the cause either.

Selachophobia – Fear of sharks

I blame the movie “Jaws” for this one. You have a much greater chance of being struck by lightning than being attacked by a shark.

 

Icthyophobia – Fear of fish

Not that many fish can actually harm you, so I’m not sure where this one comes from.

Scoleciphobia – Fear of worms

Worms can seem weird to some of us vertebrates, but you can thank them for healthy soil.

 

Cynophobia – Fear of dogs

Believe it or not, some sources claim that dogs kill over 180 people every year. However, the overwhelming majority of dogs are total sweethearts.

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Matt Steele is senior social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. Read his previous post, Animals Who Totally Own Winter.

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Collared Polar Bear at San Diego Zoo Participates in Energetics Research

Collared Polar Bear at San Diego Zoo Participates in US Geological Survey Energetics Research  	 Tatqiq, a 14-year-old polar bear dives to the bottom of her pool this morning at the San Diego Zoo, while wearing a collar outfitted with an accelerometer, thTatqiq, a 14-year-old polar bear, dives to the bottom of her pool at the San Diego Zoo while wearing a collar outfitted with an accelerometer, which measures her movements. She is wearing the collar as part of a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) project studying energy needs of polar bears that live in the Arctic.

Over several months, polar bear keepers trained the 520-pound polar bear to wear a 2.5-pound collar that measures three types of movement—up and down, side to side and back to front—16 times per second.

The data recorded from the accelerometer will be compared with video taken by USGS researchers of her activity on exhibit. Joining these two types of data will give scientists the ability to read the wave-graphs created by the accelerometer data and understand the behavior they represent, including swimming, pouncing, walking or running. By looking at data from collared polar bears in the wild, researchers will then be able to determine what the bears were doing without needing to observe them directly.

The polar bear’s remote Arctic sea ice habitat makes it nearly impossible to collect these kinds of detailed, direct observations of polar bear behavior in the wild. The data gained from accelerometers on collared polar bears in the Arctic will provide USGS scientists with new insights into the bears’ daily behavior, movements and energy demands, which will be used to better understand the effects of climate change on polar bears.

The San Diego Zoo is home to three polar bears: Tatqiq, her brother Kalluk and another female, Chinook. Polar bears are a threatened species due to climate change-driven habitat loss.

Photo taken on Feb. 9, 2015, by Tammy Spratt, San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PUBLIC RELATIONS, 619-685-3291
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Are You Over Valentine’s Day? This Might Look Familiar.

Valentine’s Day just isn’t your thing. Honestly? Because you’re just not that into it.

Photo by Ion Moe

Photo by Ion Moe

And you’re not really a fan of “getting all cleaned up” for that big date.

Photo by Ion Moe

Photo by Ion Moe

You’re also not big on PDA, like holding hands (or tails).

And you’re definitely not a hugger.

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And if you see one more candy heart with a generic love message on it you’re going to lose it!

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And chocolates? Meh. They kind of make you gag.

Photo by Sayuri

Photo by Sayuri

When you get the bill after a super fancy dinner you can barely hide your shock.

Photo by Penny Hyde

Photo by Penny Hyde

Because you’re easy to please. You don’t need some fancy meal. You’re fine eating what you always do.

Photo by Mollie Rivera

Photo by Mollie Rivera

And honestly, you’re not a big fan of crowds anyway.

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You’d just rather stay in and relax.

Photo by Helene Hoffman

Photo by Helene Hoffman

And hang out with your boo, just the two of you, just how you like it. Because that’s what Valentine’s Day should be. No stress, no obligation, just love.

Photo by Darrell Ybarrondo

Photo by Darrell Ybarrondo

Matt Steele is senior social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. Read his previous post, Animals Who Totally Own Winter.

 

 

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From Conflict to Coexistence: Part 1

A mother elephant and her calf surprised the author in Kenya.

A mother elephant and her calf surprised the author in Kenya.

“Don’t worry”, came the calm tones of my passenger (and Institute colleague) Dr. Christine Browne-Nunez, as my foot pressed hard on the clutch. I had slammed the Land Cruiser into reverse, ready for a rapid retreat back through the weave of Acacia shrubs. However, not without unease, I returned to neutral and shut off the engine.

Staring at us, having emerged from the bush onto the track in front of us, was a mature female African savanna elephant Loxodonta africana and her young calf. Despite being the most massive terrestrial mammals on the planet, elephants are surprisingly invisible in dense vegetation, and momma elephants can be very protective when surprised…

Christine and I have both worked on conservation research in East Africa over the years, but our reactions to encountering elephants in the wild were miles apart. Me: “How quickly can I backup?” Christine: “Let’s be among them, and wait for them to pass.”

The elephants passed peacefully, purposefully going about the business of consuming their daily requirement of 220 pounds (100 kilograms) or more of vegetation. In that moment, we realized that our differing reactions to encountering elephants underscored a much larger conservation dynamic in the region. The very dynamic that had led us to be in the car on that track in Samburu National Reserve, Kenya.

Christine Brown-Nunez, PhD a human dimensions of conservation specialist talking about wildlife interactions with a maasai warrior just outside Amboseli National Park.

Christine Brown-Nunez, Ph.D., talks about wildlife interactions with a Maasai warrior just outside Amboseli National Park.

Christine’s prior research focused on the human aspects of elephant conservation around Amboseli National Park. When inside Amboseli’s boundaries, the elephants are well protected [thanks to the elephant researchers, the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS), and others]. As a result they are less stressed, and do not feel as threatened in the presence of humans as do elephants in other parts of Kenya. The elephants there accept researchers, who can approach a herd and be among them. This has allowed researchers to gather the most intimate behavioral and social portraits of elephants anywhere—vital knowledge that has informed conservation.

Thanks to the equally pioneering and long-term work of Save the Elephants, when inside Samburu National Reserve, elephants now have a growing sense of security. They know that while within Samburu they are safer from human threats.

Watchful eyes of members of an elephant family group in Amboseli National Park. We know a lot about these elephants thanks to the research of the Amboseli Trust for Elephants.

Watchful eyes of members of an elephant family group in Amboseli National Park. We know a lot about these elephants thanks to the research of the Amboseli Trust for Elephants.

In contrast, my previous experiences in East Africa are among elephants outside of formally protected areas. Where elephants face daily threats such as poaching, harassment, lack of access to resources, spears and bullets—a very negative environment. For instance, while working not far from Samburu, over in Laikipia, when I encountered elephants at such close range either in my vehicle or on foot, they’d immediately charge and I’d have to make a very rapid escape. Those elephants were stressed, feeling threatened, and so they would react in kind. What is interesting, however, is that these aren’t different animals we’re talking about. When the same, calm elephants in Samburu move into less-safe environments, they become aggressive in response to close human presence.

It’s not just elephants that act differently when they know they’re in riskier areas, overlapping with humans. I’ve experienced similar reactions in giraffes. In well-protected areas, they are less concerned about close proximity to humans and livestock, whereas outside those areas, it is hard to get within 110 to 218 yards (100-200 meters) of them, creating quite a challenge for giraffe researchers like me.

One of about 60 endangered black rhino in Lewa Conservancy. Lewa’s work has dramatically reduced poaching in the area, giving these rhino a fighting chance.

One of about 60 endangered black rhino in Lewa Conservancy. Lewa’s work has dramatically reduced poaching in the area, giving these rhino a fighting chance.

This is not to vilify the people who live among elephants and other large wildlife. Living with these giants is challenging. Elephants raid crops and can destroy a family’s livelihood (often their only income for the season) in a few hours. They also damage wells and can injure and kill people and livestock. So like the elephants, people need to defend themselves, their families, and livelihoods.

However, the more concerning threats are caused by the poachers who are responsible for the shocking decline in populations of elephants, rhino, giraffes, and other wildlife for trinkets and traditional medicine. They often mow down elephants and rhinos from a distance with automatic weapons or set neck snares for giraffe. It is these external drivers that cause the most conflict. They are also the reason for plummeting wildlife populations outside protected areas, and explain why wildlife are stressed and aggressive.

Two maasai warriors get some refreshment by the new water pump near their boma just outside Ambsolei National Park, surrounded by a wall to protect against elephant damage.

Two Maasai warriors get some refreshment by the new water pump near their boma just outside Ambsolei National Park, surrounded by a wall to protect against elephant damage.

East African pastoralists, or livestock herders, historically coexisted with wildlife. In fact over the millennia, both wildlife and human systems evolved in synch. Today, pastoralism remains a primary form of livelihood in East Africa. This complementary land use is key to successful wildlife conservation. Pastoralism leaves a porous landscape where herbivores and carnivores can live, access resources, and can travel between parks in search of resources, territory, or mates. Without such spaces and corridors, populations in protected pockets will atrophy and vanish, as isolated parks are too small for large, wide-ranging species.

The downside is that it is also in these vital areas where wildlife encounter their greatest threats, not only from poaching, but also from localized conflicts and ever-increasing habitat fragmentation.

It is in these complex settings that innovative conservation efforts are needed. As conservationists we need to understand not only what is happening with wildlife, but with the people living alongside and interacting with wildlife. This is the reason for our visit to Kenya, to move from conflict to coexistence between wildlife, people and livestock.

To be continued… Check back tomorrow to get to know the groups David and Christy met with, and what the future holds for collaborative conservation.

David OConnor is a research coordinator for the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research. Read his previous post, Understanding Wildlife Trade in Asia.