Public Relations

Public Relations

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Transparency Leads to High Rating for San Diego Zoo Global Fiscal Management

Global_logo_color webFor the third year in a row San Diego Zoo Global has earned a four-star rating from Charity Navigator for its fiscal management and commitment to accountability. A three-year, four-star rating is achieved by only 12 percent of the 8,000 organizations surveyed. The rating system serves as a guide offering information for philanthropy.

“We are proud to be a trusted destination for conservation philanthropy,” said Douglas G. Myers, president and CEO of San Diego Zoo Global. “We work hard to ensure that money raised for our mission goes immediately into the important work saving species from extinction.”

Over the last three years San Diego Zoo Global has committed more than $500 million for animal care, exhibits, education programs and conservation initiatives. Significant programs include its ongoing work to recover the California condor, head-starting and reintroduction programs for Caribbean iguanas, contribution to knowledge about giant pandas and support for fieldwork on six continents.

Charity Navigator works to help charitable givers make intelligent giving decisions by providing information on more than 8,000 charities nationwide and by evaluating their financial health. It calculates each charity’s score based upon several broad criteria, including how much is spent per dollar raised, what percentage of funds goes to programs vs. administrative and fund-raising expenses, and the organization’s long-term financial health. It then assigns a rating from one to four, with four being the best rating. San Diego Zoo Global has received a four-star rating through this system seven times in the last eight years.

Bringing species back from the brink of extinction is the goal of San Diego Zoo Global. As a leader in conservation, the work of San Diego Zoo Global includes onsite wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, as well as international field programs on six continents. The work of these entities is inspiring children through the San Diego Zoo Kids network, reaching out through the Internet and in children’s hospitals nationwide. The work of San Diego Zoo Global is made possible by the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy and is supported in part by the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global.

CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PUBLIC RELATIONS, 619-685-3291
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“Hoo” Is That on My Shoulder: Butterfly Jungle Opens at San Diego Zoo Safari Park

A giant owl butterfly sits on the shoulder of amused Gabrielle Ortiz, age 12, of Carlsbad, this morning during a preview of Butterfly Jungle at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

A giant owl butterfly sits on the shoulder of amused Gabrielle Ortiz, age 12, of Carlsbad, this morning during a preview of Butterfly Jungle at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

Thousands of butterflies floated and fluttered around the Hidden Jungle Aviary at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park this morning as children and adults alike marveled at the beautiful winged insects.  The attendees were treated to a sneak peek of the Safari Park’s annual springtime event, Butterfly Jungle, which opens Saturday, March 14 and runs through April 12.

At Butterfly Jungle, the walk-through Hidden Jungle aviary has been transformed into a temporary home for more than 30 species of butterflies. In the aviary, the delicate and colorful creatures surround guests, fluttering lightly through the warm air to find flowers to feed upon. The aviary is also home to lush greenery and exotic birds including finches, colorful turacos and sunbirds, as well as many others.

“Butterfly Jungle heralds the start of spring at the Safari Park,” said Michael Mace, the Safari Park’s curator of birds. “It’s one of the most popular events we hold all year.”

The beautiful butterflies not only enchant guests but make ecological sense. They come to the Safari Park in the pupae stage from Asia, Africa, and Central, South and North America. “If they weren’t harvesting butterflies, many of these farmers would clear cut their land and plant crops or raise cattle,” Mace said. “Instead, when they harvest butterflies, they leave the land in its pristine state.”

The more than 30 species of butterflies highlighted during this year’s Butterfly Jungle include the zebra longwing, orange-barred tiger, Grecian shoemaker, monarch, giant swallowtail and blue morpho. In addition, the butterflies include the threatened birdwing species from Indonesia. The Safari Park was able to offer sanctuary to these rare insects after they were confiscated by U.S. Fish & Wildlife officials from an illegal shipment sent to the United States earlier this month.

Guests to Butterfly Jungle are encouraged to wear bright colors and move slowly to increase the chances of butterflies landing on their clothes or hats. When the insects do land, guests should enjoy the close encounter, but don’t touch, because it could harm the butterfly. Guests also are encouraged to document their Butterfly Jungle experience this year by posting photos to Instagram using #butterflyjungle. The Safari Park will be looking at guest photos and selecting an Instagram grand-prize winner at the end of the four-week event. Butterfly Jungle runs March 14 to April 12, with extended Park hours from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. The ever-popular event is included with admission to the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

Bringing species back from the brink of extinction is the goal of San Diego Zoo Global. As a leader in conservation, the work of San Diego Zoo Global includes onsite wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, as well as international field programs on six continents. The work of these entities is inspiring children through the San Diego Zoo Kids network, reaching out through the Internet and in children’s hospitals nationwide. The work of San Diego Zoo Global is made possible by the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy and is supported in part by the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global.

Photo taken on March 13, 2015 by Tammy Spratt, San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PUBLIC RELATIONS, 619-685-3291

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San Diego Zoo Safari Park Celebrates Gorilla’s First Birthday

Joanne, a western lowland gorilla, digs out the frozen treats inside her first birthday cake Thursday morning at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

Joanne, a western lowland gorilla, digs out the frozen treats inside her first birthday cake Thursday morning at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

Guests were lined up along the entire gorilla-viewing area this morning at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park to watch the troop’s reaction to the gifts and decorations for Joanne’s first birthday.

The birthday girl rode out on her mother’s back and stayed there while her mother, Imani, swiped up an ice cupcake–made with pureed yams–and hopped down when mom stopped to lick a mirrored toy smeared with peanut butter. The rest of the troop scattered throughout the exhibit to try to find their favorite snacks.

There were two cakes–a large one for the troop—and a smaller, Joanne-sized cake, both colored orange using oranges, orange juice and pureed yams and sweet potatoes. A Safari Park volunteer even made a cardboard doll house for Joanne with the house number “1” on the front.

Animal care staff had drawn “Happy Birthday Joanne” with chalk on the rock walls at the back of the gorilla habitat and filled the grassy yard with gift boxes filled with treats including sunflower seeds, peanuts, fruit slices and vegetables, encouraging the gorillas to forage for their food, which is a natural behavior for this species.

While the entire troop helped to open the boxes placed around the exhibit, Joanne was happy to dig out the fruit and vegetables that were frozen into her cake. She ventured away from Mom and foraged on her own, and could be seen eating flowers from plant trimmings given to the gorillas by Park horticulture staff.

“This is an extra-special first birthday because Joanne did have a very difficult start coming into the world,” said Peggy Sexton, animal care manager at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. “She had to be born via C-section, and had some medical problems. But those were all resolved in about 10 days and she was re-introduced to the troop and now she’s just as normal as can be.”

Joanne was born on March 12, 2014, at the Paul Harter Veterinary Hospital via a rare emergency C-section, which was needed due to complications during first-time mother Imani’s labor. After spending 11 days in the hospital, Joanne was strong and healthy enough to travel to the gorilla house to be reunited with her mother and meet the rest of the gorilla troop.

Now a year old, Joanne is very active and can be seen running around the grassy habitat in Gorilla Forest and playing with other members of the troop including youngsters, 3-year-old Monroe and 6-year-old Frank. Keepers say that the young males are eager to interact with Joanne and even though Imani is very protective of her baby, she sometimes lets Frank briefly hold her. Younger male, Monroe, often will play a more mischievous role, poking and peering at Joanne before quickly running away.

While her primary source of nutrition is still from nursing, the growing gorilla is curious of any food items that her mother is eating and will watch as Imani forages, mimicking those behaviors by picking up fruits and veggies on her own.

Joanne was named in honor of Joanne Warren, the first chairwoman of the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global.

Bringing species back from the brink of extinction is the goal of San Diego Zoo Global. As a leader in conservation, the work of San Diego Zoo Global includes onsite wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, as well as international field programs on six continents. The work of these entities is inspiring children through the San Diego Zoo Kids network, reaching out through the Internet and in children’s hospitals nationwide. The work of San Diego Zoo Global is made possible by the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy and is supported in part by the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global.

Photo taken on March 12, 2015 by Tammy Spratt, San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PUBLIC RELATIONS, 619-685-3291
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Giant Panda Undergoes Artificial Insemination Procedure at the San Diego Zoo

Bai Yun has given birth and raised six cubs at the San Diego Zoo's Giant Panda Research Station.

Bai Yun has raised six cubs at the San Diego Zoo’s Giant Panda Research Station.

Veterinarians, reproductive physiologists, and animal care staff filled an exam room at the San Diego Zoo’s animal hospital this morning. Everyone with a role to fulfill gathered for the artificial insemination procedure of Bai Yun, a 23-year-old giant panda.

Following two 30-minute natural breeding sessions on Tuesday that didn’t appear to animal care staff to be successful, as well as hormone testing that showed that Bai Yun had already ovulated, the animal care team knew they had a very short window of time to take advantage of her estrous cycle.

It was decided that sperm from the Frozen Zoo® would be thawed and used for an artificial insemination procedure on Wednesday morning. The sperm used is from giant panda, Shi Shi, who was the first breeding partner for Bai Yun. His sperm was used during an artificial insemination procedure with Bai Yun in 1999. That procedure produced the first cub born at the San Diego Zoo, a female named Hua Mei. In 2003 Shi Shi returned to China for his retirement years, and he died in 2008.

Scientists at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research will run daily tests on Bai Yun’s urine following today’s artificial insemination and expect to know within a month if the panda has conceived. It could take up to three months to determine if a fertilized egg had implanted—thermal imaging will be used to determine implantation.

A panda’s fertilized egg remains suspended until a trigger in the environment indicates it is time to implant. The trigger is still not fully understood by scientists. Giant pandas routinely delay the implantation of the fetus as long as four months. After implantation, the fertilized egg begins to develop. Impending birth is predicted on the basis of behavioral, hormonal and anatomical changes documented by the Zoo’s scientists and researchers.

Female giant pandas only experience estrus once a year and it only lasts for 48 to 72 hours. The San Diego Zoo has a record of success with six cubs being born in San Diego since 1999. Giant pandas are considered to be endangered in the wild.

Bringing species back from the brink of extinction is the goal of San Diego Zoo Global. As a leader in conservation, the work of San Diego Zoo Global includes onsite wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, as well as international field programs on six continents. The work of these entities is inspiring children through the San Diego Zoo Kids network, reaching out through the Internet and in children’s hospitals nationwide. The work of San Diego Zoo Global is made possible by the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy and is supported in part by the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global.

CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PUBLIC RELATIONS, 619-685-3291

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Adult Giant Pandas at San Diego Zoo Have First Breeding Encounter of the Season

Bai Yun and Gao Gao are a successful mating pair—they have five offspring together.

Bai Yun and Gao Gao are a successful breeding pair. They have produced five offspring together.

This morning, giant pandas Bai Yun and Gao Gao were given physical access to each other for their first breeding attempt since 2012. Researchers at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research have been monitoring the hormone levels of Bai Yun, waiting for her to show signs of estrus. Animal care staff at the San Diego Zoo watch for physical cues, like scent marking, and listening to the vocalizations of both bears.

The main panda viewing area at the Zoo was closed this morning and the online Panda Cam turned off while staff observes the bears for breeding behavior.

After seeing all the cues indicating that both bears are interested in breeding and getting test results of Bai Yun’s hormone levels, keepers opened the doors between the main viewing exhibits, allowing the bears to have contact with each other. Keepers are hopeful that the pandas will continue to show signs of interest in each other, which will prompt additional time together for breeding.

Female giant pandas only experience their estrus once a year and it only last for 48 to 72 hours. Staff will not know if this breeding season will yield a cub until a possible birth would be imminent, in approximately July 2015. The San Diego Zoo has a record of success with six cubs being born in San Diego since 1999.  Giant pandas are considered to be critically endangered in the wild.

Photo taken on March 10, 2015, by Tammy Spratt, San Diego Zoo.

CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PUBLIC RELATIONS, 619-685-3291

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California Condor Undergoing Radiation Treatment

SafariParkBlogAlmiyi, a female California condor, is being treated for a cancerous tumor. The treatment, which includes radiation therapy, is being undertaken in collaboration with the in collaboration with a team of experts at the Veterinary Specialty Hospital of San Diego in Sorrento Valley.

“Almiyi has a locally aggressive tumor right above her mouth and including her beak that needs to be treated with radiation therapy,” said Jeff Zuba D.V.M., veterinarian for San Diego Zoo Safari Park.


Almiyi was one of the first condor chicks to be hatched from an egg in 1983 when the species was at the brink of extinction due to lead poisoning encountered in the wild. Over the years she has produced a number of offspring, helping to rebuild the critically endangered condor population. Animal care staff at the Safari Park indicate that initial results of the treatment are promising; however they will be watching the bird’s quality of life over the next several weeks.

Bringing species back from the brink of extinction is the goal of San Diego Zoo Global. As a leader in conservation, the work of San Diego Zoo Global includes on-site wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, as well as international field programs on six continents. The work of these entities is made accessible to children through the San Diego Zoo Kids network reaching out through the Internet and in children’s hospitals nationwide. The work of San Diego Zoo Global is made possible by the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy and is supported in part by the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global.

CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PUBLIC RELATIONS, 619-685-3291
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Two Grevy’s Zebra Births at San Diego Zoo Safari Park Add to Endangered Population

 

A week-old Grevy’s zebra foal showed off a full set of teeth while keeping close to his mother, Mekeda, this morning at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

A week-old Grevy’s zebra foal showed off a full set of teeth while keeping close to his mother, Mekeda, this morning at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

A day-old male Grevy’s zebra stretched his legs and ran next to his mother this morning at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. The newborn foal, born yesterday, is one of two youngsters in the Grevy’s zebra herd at the Safari Park. The other foal, also a male, is just over a week old and was born on Feb. 26. The two foals are already running throughout the grassy habitat and staying close to the rest of the herd at the Safari Park.

“Once they hit the ground, within a short period of time they are ready to run,” said Jeff Gross, senior keeper at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. “Their main form of staying alive (in the wild) is actually being able to keep up with the herd, so the importance of being able to move about, move quickly, and stay close to mother who is very protective is very important.”

A zebra foal can tell his mother apart from other zebras in the herd and knows to stay close to her by memorizing her unique stripe pattern. The memorization happens just after a zebra is born and is called imprinting. Grevy’s zebras have the skinniest stripes of any zebra species; the stripes run all the way down their back to a white belly.

The San Diego Zoo Safari Park has had 86 Grevy’s zebra births. Each birth at the Safari Park is significant, since the wild Grevy’s zebra population has been ravaged by anthrax outbreaks, dropping its ranks to an estimated wild population of 2,250. San Diego Zoo Global is a member of the Grevy’s Zebra Trust, an independent wildlife conservation organization in Kenya, and its researchers are working with other conservation groups to help preserve the population.

Guests visiting the Safari Park can see the two youngsters, as well as the rest of the Grevy’s zebra herd, from the Africa Tram ride, a guided tram tour that takes guests around the Safari Park’s African field exhibits and gives guests a chance to connect with wildlife on a closer level.

Bringing species back from the brink of extinction is the goal of San Diego Zoo Global. As a leader in conservation, the work of San Diego Zoo Global includes onsite wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, as well as international field programs on six continents.  The work of these entities is inspiring children through the San Diego Zoo Kids network, reaching out through the Internet and in children’s hospitals nationwide.  The work of San Diego Zoo Global is made possible by the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy and is supported in part by the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global.

Photo taken on March 6, 2015, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PUBLIC RELATIONS, 619-685-3291

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San Diego Zoo Safari Park Aflutter in Anticipation of Butterfly Jungle, March 14 through April 12

Butterfly keeper Amy Morice carefully releases recently hatched blue morpho butterflies from a butterfly release box into the Hidden Jungle aviary at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, in preparation for Butterfly Jungle.

Butterfly keeper Amy Morice carefully releases recently hatched blue morpho butterflies from a butterfly release box into the Hidden Jungle aviary at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, in preparation for Butterfly Jungle.

Butterfly keepers, horticulturists and arborists are busy preparing the Hidden Jungle Aviary at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park for the opening of Butterfly Jungle. Trees and plants have been trimmed, colorful plants full of succulent nectar will soon be placed as a food source for the winged insects, and shipments of butterfly pupae (also known as chrysalides) have been arriving almost daily for the annual springtime event which takes place March 14 through April 12.

Butterfly pupae are arriving from various countries including a shipment of 500 pupae, which arrived earlier today from Costa Rica. Butterfly farming is a sustainable use of rain forest in Costa Rica, and the importation of these butterflies promotes conservation of this habitat.

When shipments arrive, animal care staff carefully unpacks the pupae, sort and count them before gently pinning its silk attachment into a butterfly hatching box, where they remain until they are ready to emerge, sometimes within hours or days. Once the butterflies emerge from their chrysalides they are placed in a butterfly release box and let out into the Hidden Jungle aviary. The Park’s horticulture staff replaces 200 to 300 plants of a dozen varieties each week during the event to make sure the flowers are fresh and full of nectar for the butterflies.

At Butterfly Jungle, guests at the Safari Park are enchanted and spellbound as thousands of butterflies flitter around them in the walk-through aviary, which also is home to lush greenery and exotic birds including finches, colorful turacos and the beautiful sunbird, as well as many more.

The more than 30 species of butterflies highlighted during this year’s Butterfly Jungle hail from Africa, Asia, Central, and South and North America and include the zebra longwing, orange-barred tiger, Grecian shoemaker, monarch, giant swallowtail and blue morpho. In addition, the butterflies include the endangered Birdwing species from Indonesia. The Safari Park was able to offer sanctuary to these rare insects after they were confiscated by U.S. Fish & Wildlife officials from an illegal shipment sent to the United States earlier this week.

Butterfly Jungle runs for four weeks, March 14 to April 12, with extended Park hours from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Due to the popularity of this event, priority butterfly viewing is now available for a nominal fee. Guests to Butterfly Jungle are encouraged to wear bright colors and move slowly to attract the butterflies. Butterflies may land on a shoulder, head or anywhere they desire! Butterfly Jungle is included in Safari Park admission.

Bringing species back from the brink of extinction is the goal of San Diego Zoo Global. As a leader in conservation, the work of San Diego Zoo Global includes onsite wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, as well as international field programs on six continents. The work of these entities is inspiring children through the San Diego Zoo Kids network, reaching out through the Internet and in children’s hospitals nationwide. The work of San Diego Zoo Global is made possible by the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy and is supported in part by the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global.

Photo taken on March 5, 2015 by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PUBLIC RELATIONS, 619-685-3291
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Largest-Ever Approved Desert Tortoise Preserve Created by Cadiz, Inc.; San Diego Zoo Global Contracted to Assist Species Management

Global_logo_color webSan Diego Zoo Global announced that it will be working with Cadiz Inc. to manage the newly created Fenner Valley Desert Tortoise Conservation Bank. Cadiz Inc. is creating the Bank by designating up to 7,400 acres of its private land holdings in eastern San Bernardino County for permanent protection through the establishment of the Fenner Valley Desert Tortoise Conservation Bank. The Bank, largest-ever approved by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (“CDFW”), will provide permanent protection of habitat for the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), a California State and federally listed threatened species.

“With scores of projects planned in Southern California that could place the desert tortoise at risk, we are fortunate that Cadiz is able to protect such vast territory for the benefit of this threatened animal and others,” said Ron Swaisgood Ph.D., Director of Applied Animal Ecology, San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research. “It is through such actions and ongoing research at these protected lands that sustainable recovery of the threatened desert tortoise could one day be achieved.”

Under an MOU with Cadiz Inc., San Diego Zoo conservation experts will work with the Bank to assist in the development of conservation management strategies for the threatened desert tortoise and other conservation-dependent wildlife within the bank properties.

The properties enrolled in the Bank are located in the Mojave Desert near the Mojave National Preserve and the Nevada border in an area designated by the United States Fish & Wildlife Service as Desert Tortoise Critical Habitat. These properties are undeveloped and home to various threatened species in addition to the desert tortoise.

The Fenner Conservation Bank was approved by the CDFW, the public agency responsible for coordinating California’s land conservation banking program. Under the CDFW program, private lands enrolled in a conservation bank can be used to offset impacts to species or habitats that may occur outside of the bank’s boundaries. The approval of the Fenner Conservation Bank by the CDFW allows bank credits, which are associated with certain parcels of land, to be made available immediately to those projects and entities seeking to offset impacts to the desert tortoise across the Southern California desert region. It is anticipated that various projects planned for the desert, including renewable energy projects, will benefit from the credits that will be available from the Fenner Conservation Bank.

“The California desert is home to unique environmental treasures as well as exceptional industries and businesses, all of which define our greatness. I’m grateful to private landowners like Cadiz that can enter into public-private ventures such as conservation banks for the benefit of the desert environment, because without such partners our State’s ability to balance species protection with our development needs would be greatly limited,” said U.S. Congressman Paul Cook, (CA-8).

Upon sale of credits, the associated property will be permanently protected under a conservation easement and managed in perpetuity by the San Diego Habitat Conservancy, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing high-quality habitat management services in undeveloped areas throughout Southern California.

“The San Diego Habitat Conservancy is excited to be participating in this first of its kind desert tortoise conservation bank. This creative, long-term resource management effort will greatly benefit the species by guaranteeing safe, sustainable habitat in perpetuity for this dangerously threatened species,” said Don Scoles, Executive Director of the San Diego Habitat Conservancy.

Veteran land conservation consultants, Michael McCollum of McCollum Associates and Barry Jones of Sweetwater Environmental Biologists, Inc., coordinated the establishment of the Fenner Conservation Bank for Cadiz. McCollum and Jones were also instrumental in the development of the state and federal conservation banking policy program and are responsible for guiding the creation of over 17 conservation and mitigation banks in California.

About Cadiz Inc.
Founded in 1983, Cadiz Inc. is a land and water resource development company that owns 70 sq. miles of property and water rights in Southern California. The Company is engaged in a combination of organic farming and water supply and storage projects, including the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery & Storage Project, a public-private partnership approved to provide a new, reliable water supply throughout Southern California. Cadiz abides by a “Green Compact” focused on sustainable practices to manage its land, water and agricultural resources and has committed to implement its projects without harm to the environment. For more information about Cadiz, visit cadizinc.com.

About San Diego Zoo Global
Bringing species back from the brink of extinction is the goal of San Diego Zoo Global. As a leader in conservation, the work of San Diego Zoo Global includes onsite wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, as well as international field programs on six continents. The work of these entities is made accessible to children through the San Diego Zoo Kids network reaching out through the Internet and in children’s hospitals nationwide. The work of San Diego Zoo Global is made possible by the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy and is supported in part by the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global.

CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PUBLIC RELATIONS, 619-685-3291
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Rare Rescued Butterflies Get New Home at San Diego Zoo Safari Park

SafariParkSan Diego Zoo Safari Park animal care staff gently unpacked 130 butterfly pupae on Thursday, February 26. The pupae, living butterfly cocoons, are an endangered species from Indonesia. The insects were confiscated by U.S. Fish & Wildlife officials from a shipment sent into the United States.

“The butterfly pupae are known by the common name, Birdwing, and they are a CITES 1 protected species,” said Michael Mace, curator of birds at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. “We have been able to offer sanctuary to these rare insects and expect that they will live out their lives here at the Park.”

Animal care staff at the Park indicated that some of the pupae were damaged due to crowding and lack of protection in the shipment containers. They have carefully unpacked and positioned the survivors so that they have the opportunity to emerge from their cocoons as they would in the wild.

Bringing species back from the brink of extinction is the goal of San Diego Zoo Global. As a leader in conservation, the work of San Diego Zoo Global includes on-site wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, as well as international field programs on six continents. The work of these entities is made accessible to children through the San Diego Zoo Kids network reaching out through the Internet and in children’s hospitals nationwide. The work of San Diego Zoo Global is made possible by the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy and is supported in part by the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global.

CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PUBLIC RELATIONS, 619-685-3291