Animals site sub feature

Animals site sub feature

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One Day in Suzhou for the Yangtze Giant Softshell Turtle

With great skill, the author carefully opens a turtle egg to remove a sample for examination under the microscope.

To uncover clues to the mystery of the lack of Rafetus hatchings, the author removes a sample from an egg to view under a microscope. Photo: Gerald Kuchling

With the last remaining breeding pair in captivity, the Yangtze giant softshell turtle Rafetus swinhoei is one of the world’s most critically endangered species. Housed together at China’s Suzhou Zoo, the pair’s breeding success is crucial to the survival of their species.

Although the female has laid hundreds of eggs since 2008, none of her eggs have hatched and the lack of Rafetus hatchlings over the last several years has raised more questions than answers. My involvement in the Rafetus breeding program at the Suzhou Zoo began this past summer with the trip of a lifetime to help save the Yangtze giant softshell turtle from extinction.

As part of my Master’s degree, I am working in the Reproductive Physiology Division at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, developing a technique for oocyte membrane-bound sperm detection (OMSD) for use in the management of endangered turtles and tortoises. OMSD tests for the presence of sperm in eggs that fail to develop an embryo. This information, in combination with behavioral observations, reproductive history, and veterinary examination, can be used to make educated decisions about breeding pairs to increase the chance for future offspring. For example, an egg containing sperm indicates that the male is producing functional sperm capable of progressing up the female’s oviduct to the oocyte. Sperm absence, on the other hand, can point toward a reproductive problem.

Although the female giant softshell turtle has laid numerous eggs, non have been fertile.

Although the female giant softshell turtle has laid numerous eggs, none have been fertile.

With the help of the Turtle Conservancy’s Behler Chelonian Center, we tested OMSD on a variety of turtle and tortoise eggs. This exciting innovation led to a whirlwind trip, organized by the Turtle Survival Alliance and the Wildlife Conservation Society, to fly me to the Suzhou Zoo so I could examine eggs of the critically endangered Rafetus. Within days of the female Rafetus nesting, I was on my way to Shanghai. After almost 36 hours of planes, trains, and automobiles, I was greeted in Suzhou by turtle conservationist and my personal hero, Dr. Gerald Kuchling. We went straight to work, as I only had one full day in China before I needed to take a flight back to San Diego. We picked up the eggs at the Suzhou Zoo, where I got a quick glimpse of the female Rafetus, then drove straight to Suzhou University and I spent the afternoon examining as many Rafetus eggs as possible. After several hours hunched over a microscope, I made the disheartening announcement that I was unable to confirm the presence of sperm.

So what is happening between the pair of Yangtze giant softshell turtles? My results indicate that the male Rafetus is either not capable of successful copulation and insemination of the female, not producing sperm, or that he is making low quality sperm that cannot fertilize the female’s oocytes. Although discouraging, this new piece of information provides valuable insight into the potential cause of past reproductive failure. What’s next for the Rafetus pair in Suzhou? First and foremost, a comprehensive reproductive exam is needed to evaluate the fertility status of the male Rafetus. If the male is producing viable sperm, but is not capable of breeding with the female, collection of his sperm followed by artificial insemination could be used to circumvent the problem. In the event that the male Rafetus is deemed infertile, the female will require a new breeding partner.

At this point, it appears that the greatest chance of bringing another male Rafetus to the Suzhou Zoo lies in the hands of Dr. Kuchling, who has been working with the Kunming Institute of Zoology to locate other Yangtze giant softshell turtles in the wild. In the meantime, we continue to hold our breath as we wait for the results of the male’s reproductive exam. Although the odds seem stacked against the Rafetus, only time will tell whether this species can be saved.

Kaitlin Croyle is a research assistant with the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research. Read her previous blog, When an Egg Won’t Hatch.

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Happy Anniversary, Gao Gao!

Celebrating a dozen delightful years with Gao Gao!

January 15, 2015 marks a dozen delightful years with Gao Gao at the Zoo!

Gao Gao’s 12th anniversary (he arrived in San Diego Jan. 15, 2003) is coming up at the San Diego Zoo and what a glorious time it has been. He has been the perfect mate for Bai Yun and has fathered five cubs (Mei Sheng, Su Lin, Zhen Zhen, Yun Zi, and Xiao Liwu). He may be small but he has a huge personality and presence among his keepers. As he always enjoys and demands his daily scratches from us.

This Thursday, Gao Gao will have a quiet anniversary celebration in the Classroom Exhibit with some special enrichment throughout the day that will include his favorite scents: cinnamon spice, ginseng root perfume, and rubbing alcohol!. He does not get an ice cake anymore due to his old teeth, but he will get extra apples and honey, and my favorite part of the day—extra scratches from his keepers.

Lately, Gao Gao has preferred the quiet life of living in the classroom exhibits with access to his bedroom whenever he desires. His exhibit is not open to the public and only gets visits by early morning tours and special behind the scenes events. You can see him on Panda Cam Daily from 6:30a.m. until 2:30p.m. PST.

Jennifer Becerra is a senior keeper at the San Diego Zoo. Read her previous post, Panda Party for Mr. Wu.

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Happy Birthday, Zoo Elephants!

Shaba celebrated her birthday with a specially made "cake."

Shaba celebrated her birthday with a specially made “cake” stuffed with treats.

The beginning of every year is a time for celebration at the Elephant Care Center at the San Diego Zoo—it’s when we mark all of our elephants’ “birthdays.” Because we do not know the exact days that any of the elephants were born on, it makes it easy for us to keep track of their ages by having everyone “roll over” at the same time.

Shaba demonstrates that one CAN have her cake and eat it, too!

Shaba demonstrates that one CAN have her cake and eat it, too!

This year we are celebrating a milestone with Shaba, our youngest elephant who just turned 35 years old! Shaba is a female African elephant that has lived at the San Diego Zoo for more than three years. For her birthday, a dedicated group of Zoo volunteers crafted a giant cake out of cardboard and tasty produce for Shaba to consume on her own, and it didn’t take long for her to break apart the cake to reach the goodies inside. A group of more than 200 volunteers, guests, and zoo staff sang ‘Happy Birthday’ while she enjoyed her special treat. Before too long, we let elephants Mary and Mila join Shaba at the buffet, and it was completely devoured by the end of the day!

The Conrad Prebys Elephant Care Center was designed to care for aging elephants. All seven elephants in our herd are past reproductive age and will live out the rest of their lives with us at the Zoo. Mary, our most dominant female elephant, turned 51 this year, while Sumithi, the second-most dominant, turned 48. Here’s how old the rest of the “girls” are now: Tembo is 44, Mila is 42, and Devi just turned 38. Our bull elephant Ranchipur is now 49 years old, making him the fifth-oldest male elephant in North America.

An elephant-size thank you to the Zoo volunteers and keepers that created Shaba's marvelous cake!

An elephant-size thank you to the Zoo volunteers and keepers that created Shaba’s marvelous cake!

We want to especially thank the Zoo volunteers who took the time to create the cake for Shaba this year. It is always fun not only for the elephants, but for the keepers as well to enjoy these special moments. We appreciate all of the time and dedication you give the Zoo each and every day of each and every year.

Robbie Clark is keeper at the San Diego Zoo. REad his previous blog, Elephants Mila and Mary Meet.

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California Condors: Little Things, Big Effects

Condors have excellent vision, but some threats are too small for even these birds to see.

Condors have excellent vision, but some threats are too small for even these birds to see.

In spring of 2011, I served as a summer research fellow at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research. Here I learned that I could contribute to the conservation of endangered species in a way I never dreamed possible: on a molecular level! To say this was a stretch for me is an understatement. Freshman year of undergrad I distinctly remember the shock when I was handed back my first BIO 101 exam: it was the first “D” I ever received at any time as a student. I turned to my friend and proclaimed, “I will NEVER work with something I cannot see,” (referencing biological materials such as DNA, RNA, and proteins), conclusively announcing “All I want to do is work with animals.”

Despite my initial frustration, I stuck with the biology major, tagged on an animal science minor, and got a keeper internship at my local zoo. The internship turned into a part-time job working hands-on with exotic animals, a dream come true! While zookeeping was a very gratifying job, reproductive physiology had caught my attention not only in the classroom but through my experience at the zoo. I was amazed at how reproductive techniques such as semen collection, artificial insemination, and hormone monitoring could inform animal managers and scientists of a broader picture not always seen by the naked eye. My interest and enthusiasm landed me an internship in the Reproductive Physiology Division at the Institute and, eventually, a permanent position as a research technician. We work on traditional gamete preservation, hormone monitoring, and the exciting new field in the zoo world: environmental toxicology. This research combines molecular techniques and endocrinology to explore the effects of chemicals found in the environment on the development and reproduction of captive and wild animals.

I am now a graduate from the University of Missouri’s animal science master’s program with a thesis describing the molecular interactions of environmental chemicals and hormone receptors of a critically endangered species, the California condor. Needless to say, I have changed my stance on working with biological materials that are not visible to the naked eye!

HEK cells (seen here at 100 times their actual size) are used as concor receptor factories to study the effects of environmental contaminants on reproduction. Photo by Rachel Felton

HEK cells (seen here at 100 times their actual size) are used as condor receptor factories to study the effects of environmental contaminants on reproduction.

In the Lab
In my previous post DDT: Another Challenge for California Condor, I explained our first investigations of the effects of environmental chemicals on California condor reproduction. In the lab, we were able to develop an assay to screen condor estrogen receptors (ERs) with chemicals found circulating in the blood of condors living along California’s coast to detect activation of these hormone receptors. Determining which chemicals mimic (activate ERs) or block (deactivate ERs) signaling of the endogenous hormone estrogen will be an important step in better understanding the endocrine-disrupting potential of chemicals found in the condor’s coastal environment.

Chemical concentrations circulating in condor blood activated condor estrogen receptors in the lab. This discovery lead us to speculate that in the wild, coastal condors are being exposed to levels of chemicals that may cause developmental and/or reproductive harm. The chemical load in condors today is similar to that found in other birds of prey along the California coast such as the bald eagle and peregrine falcon. These species have experienced eggshell thinning in the past. Unfortunately, eggshell thinning is already compromising the coastal condor population.

Relocating California condors to coastline habitats reduces chances of lead poisoning but may pose other risks.

Relocating California condors to coastline habitats reduces chances of lead poisoning but may contain other, unseen threats.

In the Field
What does this mean for free-flying condors? The cliffs along the Southern California coast may not be the ideal escape from the threats of lead poisoning. If chronic exposure and the production of thin eggshells continue in the population, there is the potential for long-term effects since coastal condors are sensitive at the molecular level to contaminants found in their diets. In Oregon and Washington, condor reintroduction was put on hold due to elevated levels of chemicals in the blubber of marine mammals.

In Baja California, Mexico, the wild condor population may have to be moved to the coast of Mexico. Conservation managers are hoping to wean condors off expensive supplemental feedings and toward a diet composed of beached marine mammals. But before relocation of this population occurs, chemical compositions of beached marine mammals at the potential release sites will be evaluated in the lab for endocrine-disrupting capabilities. Our goal is to move condors away from lead and intensive management practices, but not into another health-compromising situation.

Rachel Felton is a senior research technician at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research.

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14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014

This year, the Safari Park baby boom provided over 650 tiny new additions to our animal family, some of which were released into the wild. From cute chicks to courageous calves and cubs, here are some of the noteworthy births we saw in 2014:

1. Leroy, the resilient giraffe calf.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Leroy

The birth of our first Uganda giraffe calf on January 8 was a marvelous way to kick off the New Year. However, shortly after Shani’s calf arrived, keepers noticed the youngster was exhibiting signs of weakness and not eating well. At two weeks old, Leroy was sent to the Safari Park’s Harter Veterinary Medical Center, where he spent 39 days in treatment for a severe bacterial infection. Nursing was impossible, so his human keepers filled in as surrogate parents, bottle-feeding the young calf three to five times a day. After extensive care, Leroy made a full recovery and was welcomed back into his herd with kisses and nose rubs in April.

2. Tanu’s spirited stripes.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Tanu

The endangered Grevy’s zebra population saw a tiny black-and-white boost when Bakavu gave birth to her fifth foal, Tanu, on January 3. Tanu was able to tell his mother apart from other zebras in the herd and knew to stay close to her by memorizing Bakavu’s unique stripe pattern.

3. Parvesh, the lord of celebration.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Parvesh

Parvesh, which means lord of celebration in Hindi, was born on February 25 to mother Alta and father Bophu. When he was nine weeks old, the greater one-horned rhino calf moved into the Asian Plains habitat and started making his own rules. Parvesh’s charming personality demands the attention of our guests,

4. One little gorilla named Joanne.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Joanne

When Imani had her first baby on March 12, the 18-year-old mother had to be sedated and whisked to the Harter Veterinary Medical Center for an emergency C-section. The fragile infant, named Joanne, stayed at the veterinary hospital for round-the-clock care. Due to the long labor, Joanne was having trouble breathing, and it turned out that she had a collapsed lung and pneumonia. Twelve days later, the baby was laid down in a nest of soft hay in the gorilla bedroom, and Imani was let in. The moment Joanne was reunited with her mother will forever live in our hearts. This gorilla’s story was (and still is) incredible.

5. Cheetah and puppy best friends.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Ruuxa and Raina

Ruuxa and Raina became an overnight sensation. The six-week-old cheetah cub and seven-week-old Rhodesian ridgeback were the youngest animal ambassador pairing since the program began. Shortly after their introduction, Ruuxa underwent surgery to repair a growth abnormality in his limbs. Raina, whose name means guardian, stayed by the cheetah cub’s side throughout the procedure and continues to be an attentive and loyal friend.

6. Jackson, the curious okapi calf.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Jackson

Gestation for okapis can last from 14 to 16 months, so the birth of Jackson in July was a highly anticipated event. The curious calf stayed close to his mother but kicked his way into our hearts as well.

7. A rare crane chick.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Wattled crane chick

Our very first wattled crane chick shuffled its way into our hearts this summer. Wattled cranes are the rarest crane species found in Africa, so this chick was (and still is) a treasure.

8. Our first Masai giraffe calves.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Gowon

We have a total of 134 Ugandan giraffes and 23 reticulated giraffes, but the births of Gowon and Kamau in July marked the first time Masai giraffes have been born at the Safari Park. While Masai giraffes are the most populous of the subspecies, all wild populations have decreased significantly since the late 1990s, due to habitat loss and competition with livestock for resources. Both are aptly named in the Masai language: Gowon (pronounced Go-wan) means maker of rain and Kamau (pronounced Kam-mao) means little warrior.

9. Four reasons to roar at Lion Camp.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: 4 African lion cubs

Four little rascals debuted at Lion Camp this fall and almost doubled the size of our pride. Cubs Ernest, Evelyn, Marion, and Miss Ellen were born on June 22 but spent several months bonding with their mother, Oshana, behind the scenes. The cubs now spend their days pouncing, climbing, and testing the patience of their big cat parents.

10. Our spotted cheetah sisters.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Cheetah sisters

Ayanna and Bahati received around-the-clock care at our Animal Care Center for the past few months. The cubs were born at the Safari Park’s Cheetah Breeding Center to Allie, but animal care staff decided to hand-rear the females because their mother has been unsuccessful with previous litters. Now, the female cubs have advanced in their training and have moved to different areas of the Park, awaiting their puppy companions.

11. Luke, a leucistic waterbuck calf.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Luke

Luke has been turning heads since his arrival in September. For decades, we’ve successfully bred over 20,000 rare and endangered animals, including 278 ellipsen waterbuck, but Luke is the first-ever animal born at the Park with a condition that causes him to have reduced pigmentation. He’s a stand-out guy and receives a lot of attention from guests taking a ride on the Africa Tram.

12. Petunia, the petite rhino.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Petunia

Our 67th greater one-horned rhino, named Petunia, debuted in the Asian Plains exhibit after one month of close care. The calf weighed only 128 pounds (58 kilograms) at birth, which is small for her species, so animal care staff kept a 24-hour watch on the newborn until she was ready to leave her protected yard in September. Petunia and her mother, Tanaya, have been blooming and exploring their 40-acre (16 hectares) home since.

13. Satellite elephant calf Nandi.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Nandi

Did you hear? Our satellite herd at the Reid Park Zoo in Tuscon, Arizona, got an adorable little boost with big ears this year. The African elephant calf named Nandi is doing well and enjoying time with her herd at the Click Family Elephant Care Center.

14. Four purr-fect cheetah cubs.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: 4 cheetah cubs

photo: Ershun Lee

Four adorable cheetah cubs were born to first-time mother Addison in July at our off-site breeding center. Wgasa, Reu, Pumzika, Mahala, and their mother moved into the Okvango Outpost (and our hearts) last month. It’s certainly wonderful to see so many spots and to watch a cheetah mother raising her cubs.

 

Jenn Beening is the social media specialist for San Diego Zoo Global. Read her previous post, 10 Festive Reindeer Facts.

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No Hakuna Matata for this King

Little Evelyn finds that her father makes a fun chew toy!

Little Evelyn finds that her father makes a fun chew toy!

The San Diego Zoo Safari Park’s king celebrated Father’s Day on October 2, 2014, but the father in question wasn’t too happy about this. Izu, the Park’s male African lion, met his four newest cubs for the first time on exhibit before the Park opened to the public. Cubs Ernest, Evelyn, Marion, and Miss Ellen were born on June 22, 2014, to mother Oshana. The cubs were named for Ernest and Evelyn Rady, Marion Wilson, and Ellen Browning Scripps, all major benefactors of San Diego Zoo Global.

To prepare for the introduction, Izu and his cubs had been eyeing each other through protective barriers for the last month. Animals thrown together at random often don’t do well; keepers carefully plan introductions in stages to get the animals used to one another. Before the morning meeting on exhibit, Izu and his cubs met face to face through a “howdy door,” a door made of heavy steel mesh so they could see, smell, and hear one another. According to keeper Amy Whidden-Winter, the cubs swatted Izu’s tail, and he jumped up on a bench to get away from them. The King of the Jungle is a scaredy-cat!

On October 2, 2014, I arrived at the Park early and was lucky enough to see the lion family introduction. The keepers let Oshana and her four cubs into the outdoor exhibit first, followed immediately by Izu. He eyed the cubs and tried to sidle away from them along the edge of the exhibit. Evelyn led her siblings, with little Ernest bringing up the rear, on a stalk-and-pounce chase of Izu. Evelyn and Marion snuck up behind Izu when his back was turned and retreated as soon as he looked around. Occasionally, the bravest cubs ran up and tagged his back. Izu swatted them away like flies, and even tried spraying to mark his territory. Unfortunately for Izu, cubs don’t care about territory boundaries, and these cubs are particularly persistent and precocious.

As the morning wore on, the cubs got more and more daring. Oshana would occasionally look up from her nap when a cub hissed or Izu roared particularly loudly, but she wasn’t perturbed by the cubs’ antics. They were clearly Izu’s problem now, and it was her turn for a long-overdue catnap. According to the keepers, the four cubs have been keeping Oshana awake constantly; for a lioness used to sleeping up to 20 hours per day, that’s not desirable. Izu eventually succumbed to fatherhood: the cubs rolled on him, bit his ears, and swatted at his mane. With only an occasional roar of protest, and some hilarious facial expressions, Izu became the new babysitter. I could swear Oshana smiled in her sleep.

Visitors to the Safari Park can see Izu and Oshana on exhibit with the four cubs every morning. In the afternoon, 10-month-olds Ken and Dixie, Oshana and Izu’s first litter this year, might be on exhibit. Or Mina, the other adult female lioness in the pride, might be on exhibit with Izu to give him a well-earned respite from fatherhood. Hang in there, Izu!

Elise Newman is a Caravan Safari guide at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. Read her previous post, Who Likes the Rain: Giraffes, Rhinos, or Elephants?

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11 Animal Hairstyles Humans Should Aspire To

The super-slick curls on this curl-crested aracari would make even the smoothest operator jealous.

Photo by Bob Worthington

Photo by Bob Worthington

 

There’s only one word to describe these giraffe ponytails: EPIC.

Photo by Charles Jellison

Photo by Charles Jellison

 

This secretary bird’s hairdo means business.

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The San Diego Zoo’s mane man M’bari has a regal hairdo fit for a king.

This African crowned crane wins the award for best afro ever.

Photo by Bill Gracey

Photo by Bill Gracey

 

This baby orangutan is way more punk than you. Like way more.

 

Fresh Prince eat your heart out. This great blue turaco has the greatest flat-top to ever flat-top.

 

This Brazilian tree porcupine is single-handedly bringing back the spiked do, and looking sharp while doing it.

Photo by Ion Moe

 

Super glam red eye shadow + awesome flared pomp = EPIC WIN

 

Sure, these animals all have pretty sweet dos, but the winner of the bunch is clearly this Visayan warty pig who rocked the tussled hipster mop before it was cool.



Matt Steele is the social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. Read his previous blog, 7 Animal Life-Hacks That Will Make You Jealous.

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Hide and Seek: Followers and Tuckers

A Przewalski’s horse foal strolls next to Mom at the Safari Park.

A Przewalski’s horse foal strolls next to Mom at the Safari Park.

Spring and summer mark baby season at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and animal babies at the Safari Park fall into two categories: followers and tuckers. Followers walk, run, and jump within a half hour of birth. They follow their mothers and their herd. They can run from predators. A Przewalski’s foal is able to stand, walk, trot, neigh, and nibble forage on its birthday. Within a week, the foal is able to kick a predator to defend itself. A Przewalski’s foal born at the Safari Park on June 26, 2014, already forages independently in the field exhibit.

A baby gazelle is tucked against a log for safe keeping by Mom.

A baby gazelle is tucked against a log for safe keeping by Mom.

Conversely, tuckers are “tucked” near a rock, tree, or dirt mound after birth. The herd avoids the baby to keep its location secret. Even the tucker’s mother avoids her baby, only coming back a few times a day to nurse. She also moves her baby to different hidden locations to confuse predators. Tuckers are completely helpless, so they stay as still as possible and blend in to their surroundings, even if a predator approaches. Thomson’s gazelles are tuckers. They are the favorite food of cheetahs—infant gazelles don’t stand a chance against them. Gazelle mothers hide their babies in tall grasses for multiple days until they are strong enough to keep up with the herd. A “Tommy” calf born at the Park on June 19, 2014, still looks like a tan rock in the grass.

A gazelle baby gets an ear notch as part of its first exam.

A gazelle baby gets an ear notch as part of its first exam.

Keepers have a tough job with tucker offspring. The baby is easy to catch to give it its first exam, because tuckers can’t run yet, but keepers have to first find the baby. Have you ever tried to find a completely still infant gazelle in a 60-acre exhibit? Good luck. On a Caravan Safari, I have the privilege of watching the action first-hand and even helping keepers spot the tuckers!

Elise Newman is a Caravan Safari guide at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

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Condor Cam Chick Needs Name

Name the Condor ChickHatched on April 29, a small condor chick emerged into the world observed closely by animal care staff at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. Adding to the more than 180 condors hatched at the Safari Park since the breeding program began in 1982, the little chick was placed with adult condors Sulu and Towich so they could raise it to adulthood. Its growth has been watched by thousands of people through a live Condor Cam placed in the nest box. Now animal care staff are asking these interested watchers to help choose a name for the young female bird.

Viewers can go online at http://bit.ly/condorname to vote for one of five suggested names. In keeping with the tradition of the condor program, the names have been selected from the Kumeyaay language. The name receiving the most votes will be used for the chick for the rest of its life. Voting closes at end of day on July 20.

“California condors are an important native species in the western United States and hold a special place not only in the ecosystem but in the culture of the people native to this area,” said Michael Mace, curator of birds at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. “By giving condors names from the Kumeyaay language, we hope to honor the role of condors in human culture throughout history.”

At more than 2 months of age, the condor chick is covered with fluffy, gray feathers and is still closely cared for by its foster parents. The young bird will continue to grow and mature over the next couple of months until its flight feathers grow in and it is ready to leave the nest. Animal care staff at the Safari Park hope that the chick will be able to take its place among the wild populations that have been released in California, Arizona and Mexico.

CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PUBLIC RELATIONS, 619-685-3291

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Tigers Adjust to New Home

Tiger JoAnne is ready to meet you!

Tiger JoAnne is ready to meet you!

It’s hard to believe that it’s already been three weeks since the grand opening of the Tull Family Tiger Trail at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park! In that time, we’ve been more than impressed with how well the cats have acclimated to their new daily routines, as well as to the influx of all of their human guests! Many of the tigers seem to really enjoy making themselves as visible as possible at the glass viewing areas and appear to have a great time watching their spectators (especially the kids). The cats have quickly overcome any of the stage fright they may have first felt during their daily training demonstrations and are now quite happy to show off their skills at the interpretive wall for all those who are willing to watch!

As the cats have become more comfortable, we’ve also started to rotate them more throughout the different exhibits, making sure each of the cats gets to check out the features of each yard at least a couple of times per week. This not only gives them a chance to take advantage of all the great features in each yard but also helps to keep them active and enriched, as they get to check out all of the smells left behind by the cat before them!

When the cats aren’t on exhibit, they are enjoying the cool and comfortable accommodations of their new house. Enrichment toys, bedding, and scents furnish each of the eight rooms and are changed daily to delight their curious natures. The cats are brought into their bedrooms every morning, where we feed them their breakfast and then work on trained behaviors to challenge their minds and encourage problem solving. The tiger house also features a number of features to better allow for routine care, such as desensitization of things like voluntary blood draws, injections, ultrasounds, and crating.

With all of the wonderful elements for the tigers in both the exhibits and the house, we’re certainly able to provide these cats with fun-filled and exciting days! Be sure to watch them daily on Tiger Cam.

Lori Gallo is a keeper at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. Read her previous post, Meet the Tigers on Tiger Cam.