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About Author: Jenn Beening

Posts by Jenn Beening

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11 Incredibly Awesome Animal Moms

While baby business in the natural world differs across species, one thing for certain is the fact that moms are awesome. So today, we’re celebrating some of the best mothers we’ve recently observed at the Zoo and Safari Park.

Imani

The heartwarming bond between Imani and Joanne is a wonderful sight, especially given this little gorilla’s story.

Nindiri

7-year-old Nindiri gave birth to her third cub on March 12, 2015. The healthy cub still needs a name, vote for your favorite here.

Funani

Funani is very protective of her latest baby and has kept her calf so close that animal keepers have not been able to determine yet if the calf is male or female.

Pigs

This little piggy went to the market… these little red river piglets were born at the Safari Park last month.

chick-and-Satash

Sisquoc and Shatash’s new condor chick hatched on April 11 is very valuable to the condor population.

Jessica

When baby Denny arrived in December 2014, first-time mother Jessica naturally rose to the occasion of raising her youngster.

Onshe gave birth to her first curious kitten last October. Kamari’s cuteness can be seen in the Zoo’s Kopje area.

Oshana

Oshana the African lioness has had her paws full taking care of a cute quartet of cubs.

addison

First-time mother Addison also welcomed a cute quartet of spots last summer. Keepers describe Addison as an excellent mom, calm, confident and extremely protective.

Petunia

Petunia, born on August 1, 2014 to mother Tayana, was the 67th greater one-horned rhino to be born at the Park since 1975.

Luke

A rare white ellipsen waterbuck calf named Luke stood out among his her, but his mother kept a close watch on her youngster.

 

Jenn Beening is the social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. Read her previous post, 24 Rhino Facts You Should Know.

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24 Rhino Facts You Should Know

It’s time to stop the merciless killing of rhinos. Join us on Endangered Species Day, May 15, 2015, as we #Rally4Rhinos the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

#Rally4Rhinos

It’s estimated that a rhino is poached every 8 hours. At this rate, rhinos could become extinct in 15 years.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

In total, there are less than 30,000 rhinos remaining on Earth.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

A group of rhinos is sometimes called a “crash.”

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

Rhinos may look indestructible, but their skin is actually quite sensitive, especially to sunburn and biting insects.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

All rhinos are herbivores.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

Rhino gestation lasts 15 to 16 months. The only animal with a longer pregnancy is the elephant.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

Newborn calves are able to stand on their feet and start to nurse two to three hours after birth. ­

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

Because rhinos are very nearsighted, they often charge when startled; in the wild, rhinos have been observed charging at boulders or trees.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

The biggest threat to rhinos is humans; civil war in their native lands and poaching for their horns has decimated wild populations.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

Rhino horn is made of keratin, the same material as our fingernails.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

The demand for rhino horn has gone from subsistence hunting by locals to highly organized international crime rings.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

In 2014, the toll from poaching was the worst yet: a horrifying 1,215 rhinos were killed in South Africa.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

Close to 100 known rhino species have existed. Today, only five continue the line: two native to Africa (black and white) and three native to Asia (Greater one-horned, Javan and Sumatran).

The rhino’s ancestors walked the Earth 55 million years ago.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

Black, white and Sumatran rhinos have two horns; Javan and greater one-horned rhinos have one.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know 25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

Despite their name, black rhinos and white rhinos are the same color – brownish gray.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

Black rhinos can reach speeds of up to 40 miles per hour (64 kilometers per hour).

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

Standing at up to 6 feet (1.8 meters) at the shoulder, white rhinos are the largest rhino species and the second largest land mammal.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

White rhino males can be persistent, with courtship lasting 5 to 20 days.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

There are only five northern white rhinos remaining on the planet. One of them, an elderly female named Nola, lives at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

The three Asian rhinos use enlarged incisors or tusks, rather than their horns, when fighting or defending territory.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

All three Asian rhino species are excellent swimmers.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

Sumatran rhinos are the smallest of the five rhino species and the only type covered with a coat of shaggy hair.

25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

Through collaborative, science-based, multidisciplinary conservation efforts at the Safari Park, we have successfully added the births of 93 southern white rhinos, 66 greater one-horned rhinos, and 13 black rhinos to the worldwide population.

sdzsp-southernw sdzsp-greater 25 Rhino Facts You Should Know

Lend a hand to save rhinos. Write “STOP KILLING RHINOS” on your hand and post your photo to Instagram or Twitter with the #Rally4Rhinos hashtag. Participants are automatically entered to win two beautiful rhino paintings by Jeremy Donovan Rohr. Learn more HERE.

 

Jenn Beening is the social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. See her previous post, Best of Vine: Safari Park.

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Best of Vine: Safari Park

Nothing says cute like 6-second animal clips! Follow the Safari Park on Vine for more adorable fun.

Jenn Beening is the social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. See her previous post, DIY Succulent Centerpiece.

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DIY Succulent Centerpiece

If you haven’t stopped to smell (or observe) the flowers and plants at the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park, your senses are seriously missing out. Inspiration is in full bloom! And today, the brains behind the stunning botanical arrangements at the Safari Park are eager to share this spring-inspired DIY project.

#DIY Succulent Centerpiece

Step 1.) Start by filling the bottom of your pot with soil mixture. For best results, your mixture should be equal parts soil, pearlite, and sand.

#DIY Succulent Centerpiece

#DIY Succulent Centerpiece

Step 2.) Loosely arrange larger succulents in your pot and fill in soil to the same height as your plants.

#DIY Succulent Centerpiece

Step 3.) You can also include pre-cut succulents in your arrangement. In fact, recycling these fleshy plants is a great way to reuse them and fill any gaps in your bouquet. Just be sure to let cut plants rest in a dry place for three to five days before planting. Once they’ve dried for a few days, simply stick a hole into the soil and insert your cut stem.

#DIY Succulent Centerpiece

Step 4.) Have fun with your arrangement and try to incorporate different succulent species for a colorful display. If you’re visiting the Safari Park, stop by the Plant Trader where you can pick up drought-tolerant plants from our own collection.

#DIY Succulent Centerpiece

Do you have any horticulture-based requests for our team? Leave them in the comments and we’ll gladly offer tips from the experts.

 

Jenn Beening is the social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. Read her previous post, 19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts.

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Butterfly Jungle Instameet Recap

Saturday, March 14 marked the start of the San Diego Zoo Safari Park’s annual Butterfly Jungle event. Before it opened to the public, a handful of lucky photophiles got to preview the Hidden Jungle during our Instameet Photo-Walk & Challenge. Guests of the event had one hour to creatively capture as many photos and videos as possible, then upload their experience to Instagram. Three winners were selected by Safari Park staff based on the following categories.

Best overall photo by @duhrock

Best overall photo | Butterfly Jungle Instameet Recap

Best overall video by @petercsanadi


Best photo/caption combo by @mckenzie_bell. “Why couldn’t the butterfly go to the dance? Because it was a mothBALL #SorryCinderButterfly”

Best photo/caption combo | Butterfly Jungle Instameet Recap

Shout-out to everyone who flexed their creative muscles and participated in the Instameet! We had a blast. Keep scrolling for a few event highlights and notable submissions.

Butterfly Jungle Instameet Recap

(by @osidenative)

Butterfly Jungle Instameet Recap

(by @lisadiazphotos)

Butterfly Jungle Instameet Recap

Hangin’ around. (by @lesleyloowho)

Butterfly Jungle Instameet Recap

You’ll never have the blues at the Safari Park’s Butterfly Jungle. (by @peggy.hughes)

Butterfly Jungle Instameet Recap

(by @lidadrum)

(by @gbobina)

(by @gbobina)

 Butterfly Jungle Instameet Recap
Butterfly Jungle Instameet Recap
 Butterfly Jungle Instameet Recap
Butterfly Jungle Instameet Recap
Butterfly Jungle Instameet Recap
Butterfly Jungle Instameet Recap

Don’t forget to upload your Butterfly Jungle memories on Instagram for a chance to win a Cheetah Safari for two. Simply tag your photos with #ButterflyJungle to enter. Submissions close Sunday, April 12. VIEW THE GALLERY

Jenn Beening is the social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. Read her previous post, 19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts.

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19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

Because Butterfly Jungle is back at the Safari Park…

1. Butterflies taste with their feet.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

2. A group of butterflies is sometimes called a flutter.

A group of butterflies is sometimes called a flutter. 19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

3. Their eyes are made of 6,000 lenses and can see ultraviolet light.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

4. There are 165,000 known species of butterflies found on every continent except Antarctica.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

5. Many adult butterflies never excrete waste – they use up all they eat for energy.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

6. Despite popular belief, butterfly wings are clear – the colors and patterns we see are made by the reflection of the tiny scales covering them.

A group of butterflies is sometimes called a flutter. 19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

7. Butterfly wings move in a figure “8” motion.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

8. Butterflies vary in size – the largest species may reach 12 inches across, while the smallest may only be half an inch.

A group of butterflies is sometimes called a flutter. 19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

9. Some butterfly species lay their eggs on only one type of plant.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

10. The Very Hungry Caterpillar was no joke – the first meal after a caterpillar hatches is usually the eggshell from which it has just emerged.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

11. In some areas, the number of feeding caterpillars on plants is so great that you can actually hear them munching. Thus, manners are not important in butterfly society.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

12. The process by which a caterpillar magically transforms into a butterfly, aka metamorphosis, is completed in 10 to 15 days, depending on the species.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

13. Butterflies are essentially cold-blooded.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

14. Skipper butterflies fly so fast they could outpace a horse, but most butterflies fly at 5 to 12 miles per hour (8 to 20 kilometers per hour).

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

15. Butterflies have a long, tube-like tongue called a proboscis that allows them to soak up their food rather than sip it.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

16. Males drink from mud puddles to extract minerals that aren’t available in flowers. This behavior is known as “puddling.”

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

17. “Puddle clubs” are groups of butterflies that gather at wet soil to suck up salts and minerals.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

18. Some butterflies have been seen drinking blood from open wounds on animals.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

19. Scientists thought butterflies were deaf until the first butterfly ears were identified in 1912.

19 Fascinating Butterfly Facts

Join the conversation: Do you have any butterfly facts to add to this list? Share them in the comments.

 

Jenn Beening is the social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. Read her previous post, 13 Animals Grumpier Than Grumpy Cat.

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13 Animals Grumpier Than Grumpy Cat

Because Tardar Sauce isn’t the only one with grouchy facial expressions…

This mountain lion is ready to pick a fight.

Cougar

photo: Darrell Ybarrondo

And this tiger wants your kid to stop tapping on the glass.

Tiger

photo: Ion Moe

Benzy the honey badger just doesn’t care.

Honeybadger

And guess what? This lemur is not impressed with your fancy camera lens.

Lemur

photo: Ion Moe

Did they seriously just call me a bear? Ugh.

Koala

Don’t these hairless primates know it’s rude to point and stare? Lettuce eat.

Gorillas

photo: Helene Hoffman

This vulture chick doesn’t care about Internet stardom.

Rueppell's vulture chick

And Nindiri has the grumpy cat look down.

Jaguar

photo: Mollie Rivera

But this white-faced saki owns it.

White-faced saki

No feline is more upset than Oshana trying to raise four cubs.

Lion

photo: Bob Worthington

Except maybe this cougar.

Cougar

photo: Craig Chaddock

This is a capuchin’s “happy face.”

Capuchin monkey

And this lion-tailed macaque is smiling for the camera… j/k.

Lion-tailed macaque

Jenn Beening is the social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. Read her previous post, 9 Exotic Mating Rituals of the Animal Kingdom.

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9 Exotic Mating Rituals of the Animal Kingdom

With Valentine’s Day around the corner, now is a good time to learn about the birds and the bees. Although the wild kingdom doesn’t have the same romantic love approach to reproduction that humans claim, animals follow countless mating rituals that we might not even be aware of. Let’s look at a few.

Peacock| 9 Exotic Mating Rituals of the Animal Kingdom

photo: Angie Bell

With their fancy feathers, it’s no surprise that birds take home the prize for most exotic courting routines. It was the peacock’s train that apparently inspired Darwin’s theory of sexual selection and the evolution of esthetic beauty. Male peacocks embody one of the most impressive courting displays of the avian world, and females are rather picky about their mates. In fact, the peacock’s female-attraction power is directly related to the perfection of a male’s spectacular train, including its overall length, the number of iridescent “eyes” that are present, and even the symmetry of their pattern.

Bowerbird | 9 Exotic Mating Rituals of the Animal Kingdom

Male bowerbirds are avian artists and spend anywhere from one week to a few months building the perfect little retreat for prospective females. These creative engineers decorate their bachelor pads with available resources, like seeds, berries, leaves, and other discarded items they can find. Many have a preferred color scheme and look for items to accommodate. Some species even use their beak or a piece of bark to paint their pad with an extra splash of color to attract a mate!

Hummingbird | 9 Exotic Mating Rituals of the Animal Kingdom

Shiny feathers on a male hummingbird are thought to indicate good health, so these birds use their brilliant plumage to their advantage. Some species will form a lek, consisting of up to 100 males looking for a match. If a female shows interests in one of the tiny suitors, he then performs a flying dance to win her over.

Impala | 9 Exotic Mating Rituals of the Animal Kingdom

A variety of horned mammals also exhibit unique performances during courtship. Male impalas, for instance, have a strange way of attracting females or warning off other males: they repeatedly stick their tongue out in a display known as tongue flashing.

Goat and sheep | 9 Exotic Mating Rituals of the Animal Kingdom

Size matters when it comes to the horns on a male goat or sheep. Head-butting clashes become more violent during breeding season, and the winner typically breeds with all the females in a flock or herd. So while fighting over females is frowned upon in human relationships, it’s go big or go home with the bachelor group for these hoofed mammals.

Hippo | 9 Exotic Mating Rituals of the Animal Kingdom

The dominant male in hippo society has the right to mate with all of his herd’s females, but gaining supremacy is a dirty job. Male hippos use their fan-shaped tails to fling their dung to attract a female and remind the herd of his territory.

Ring-tailed lemur| 9 Exotic Mating Rituals of the Animal Kingdom

While humans are concerned about smelling nice when attracting a potential mate, having a strong stench is a good thing for ring-tailed lemurs. During mating season, males compete for females through stink fights that involve smearing scent from glands onto their tail and jerking and swinging the tail to waft the sharp odor toward their opponent.

Elephant | 9 Exotic Mating Rituals of the Animal Kingdom

Chivalry isn’t dead in elephant society. Adult males usually don’t live with the main herd, but during breeding season, albeit short term, these emotive pachyderms spend anywhere from one hour to a few days courting a mate.

Bonobo | 9 Exotic Mating Rituals of the Animal Kingdom

In bonobo society, females take charge. Upon entering a new troop, females will breed with all the males and gain permanent membership only after giving birth. These highly intelligent primates have also been observed using sexual behaviors for social reasons other than reproduction, such as conflict resolution.

Do you have any animal mating rituals to add to our list? Share yours in the comments.

 

Jenn Beening is the social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. Read her previous post, 14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014.

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Facebook Caturday Caption Contest

We’re running a Caturday caption contest for the Safari Park’s Facebook followers. By entering, you agree to these terms and conditions. Good luck!

#Caturday Caption Contest

1. NO PURCHASE IS NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. A purchase will not increase your chances of winning. Participation constitutes entrant’s full and unconditional agreement to and acceptance of these Official Rules. The Facebook Caturday Caption (“Contest”) will be held online from 10:00 a.m. Pacific Time (“PT”), January 10, 2015 (“Contest Start Date”), to 5:00 p.m. PT, January 11, 2015 (“Contest Period”). Contest is sponsored by the Zoological Society of San Diego DBA San Diego Zoo Global (the “Sponsor”) who is solely responsible for all aspects of this Contest.

2. ELIGIBILITY. The Contest is open to legal residents of the United States of America who are 18 years of age or older as of “Contest Start Date.” Sponsor’s employees and their immediate families are not eligible to participate or claim a prize. Void where prohibited or restricted by law. All federal, state and local laws, rules and regulations apply. By participating, entrants agree to abide by all terms of these Official Rules and to the decisions of the judge, and waive any right to claim ambiguity in the Contest or these Official Rules.

3. HOW TO ENTER.

1.) As of 10:00 a.m. PT, January 10, 2015, the entrant must:

a. Have a Facebook® account: If you are not a member, you may sign-up at www.facebook.com

b. Follow the prompt on the Facebook post found here: https://www.facebook.com/sdzsafaripark/photos/p.1107267509289924/1107267509289924/?l=11980e9cf7

No mechanically reproduced entries will be accepted.

4. INTERNET LIMITATIONS OF LIABILITY. If for any reason this Contest is not capable of running as planned due to infection by computer virus, bugs, tampering, unauthorized intervention, fraud, technical failures, or any other causes beyond the control of the Sponsor which corrupt or affect the administration, security, fairness, integrity or proper conduct of this Contest, the Sponsor reserves the right at its sole discretion, to disqualify any individual who tampers with the entry process, and to cancel, terminate, modify or suspend the Contest in whole or in part, at any time, without notice and award the prizes using all non-suspect eligible entries received as of this termination date. The Sponsor assumes no responsibility for any error, omission, interruption, deletion, defect, delay in operation or transmission, communications line failure, theft or destruction or unauthorized access to, or alteration of, entries. The Sponsor is not responsible for any problems or technical malfunction of any telephone network or telephone lines, computer on-line systems, servers, or providers, computer equipment, software, failure of any e-mail or entry to be received by the Sponsor on account of technical problems, human error or traffic congestion on the Internet or at any Website, or any combination thereof, including any injury or damage to participant’s or any other person’s computer relating to or resulting from participation in this Contest or downloading any materials in this Contest. CAUTION: ANY ATTEMPT TO DELIBERATELY DAMAGE ANY WEBSITE OR UNDERMINE THE LEGITIMATE OPERATION OF THE CONTEST IS A VIOLATION OF CRIMINAL AND CIVIL LAWS AND SHOULD SUCH AN ATTEMPT BE MADE, THE SPONSOR RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SEEK DAMAGES OR OTHER REMEDIES FROM ANY SUCH PERSON (S) RESPONSIBLE FOR THE ATTEMPT TO THE FULLEST EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW. In the event of a dispute as to the identity of a winner, the winning entry will be declared made by the authorized Facebook account holder of the entry submitted at time of entry. “Authorized account holder” is defined as the natural person who is assigned to a Facebook account by Facebook, Inc.

5. SELECTIONS AND NOTIFICATION OF WINNERS. Winners will be determined on or after January 11, 2015 by Sponsor’s staff from among all eligible entries. Winners will be notified on or after January 11, 2015 via Facebook and need not be present to win. Only one winner per household. The winner will be disqualified and an alternate winner will be selected if a selected winner fails to comply with these rules, cannot be contacted, is ineligible, fails to claim a prize, or if the prize notification or prize is returned as undeliverable. Acceptance of a prize constitutes permission to use the winners’ names, likenesses, and statements for promotional and publicity purposes without additional compensation or limitation unless prohibited by law. All decisions of the Sponsor regarding the selection of winners, notification and substitution of winners in accordance with these Official Rules shall be binding and final.

6. PRIZES AVAILABLE. One (1) winner will receive one (1) one-day pass to the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park. Substitutions of similar value will be made at the sole discretion of the Sponsor if offers are no longer available. The prize is not transferable, assignable or redeemable for cash and if not used will be forfeited.

7. INDEMNIFICATION AND RELEASE. By entering the contest and participating in any promotions relating thereto, each entrant agrees to release and hold Sponsor and respective affiliates, subsidiaries, parent companies, officers, directors, shareholders, employees, agents, participating retailers, and any other companies participating in the design, administration, or fulfillment of this sweepstakes and their respective officers, directors, employees, and agents, harmless from any and all losses, rights, claims, injuries, damages, expenses, costs, or actions of any kind resulting in whole or in part, directly or indirectly, from participation in this contest or any contest-related activity, or acceptance, possession, use or misuse of the prize or parts thereof, including without limitation personal injuries, death, and property damage and claims based on publicity rights, defamation, or invasion of privacy.

8. TAX INFORMATION. All applicable Federal, state and local tax liabilities and any other incidental expenses, fees or costs associated with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner.

9. WINNERS LIST. For an Official Winners List (available after January 11, 2015 and through December 31, 2015) or a copy of these Official Rules (PLEASE SPECIFY WHICH), send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to: San Diego Zoo Global, P.O. Box 120551, San Diego, CA 92112-0551.

10. SPONSOR. San Diego Zoo Global: P.O. Box 120551 San Diego, CA 92112-0551

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14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014

This year, the Safari Park baby boom provided over 650 tiny new additions to our animal family, some of which were released into the wild. From cute chicks to courageous calves and cubs, here are some of the noteworthy births we saw in 2014:

1. Leroy, the resilient giraffe calf.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Leroy

The birth of our first Uganda giraffe calf on January 8 was a marvelous way to kick off the New Year. However, shortly after Shani’s calf arrived, keepers noticed the youngster was exhibiting signs of weakness and not eating well. At two weeks old, Leroy was sent to the Safari Park’s Harter Veterinary Medical Center, where he spent 39 days in treatment for a severe bacterial infection. Nursing was impossible, so his human keepers filled in as surrogate parents, bottle-feeding the young calf three to five times a day. After extensive care, Leroy made a full recovery and was welcomed back into his herd with kisses and nose rubs in April.

2. Tanu’s spirited stripes.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Tanu

The endangered Grevy’s zebra population saw a tiny black-and-white boost when Bakavu gave birth to her fifth foal, Tanu, on January 3. Tanu was able to tell his mother apart from other zebras in the herd and knew to stay close to her by memorizing Bakavu’s unique stripe pattern.

3. Parvesh, the lord of celebration.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Parvesh

Parvesh, which means lord of celebration in Hindi, was born on February 25 to mother Alta and father Bophu. When he was nine weeks old, the greater one-horned rhino calf moved into the Asian Plains habitat and started making his own rules. Parvesh’s charming personality demands the attention of our guests.

4. One little gorilla named Joanne.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Joanne

When Imani had her first baby on March 12, the 18-year-old mother had to be sedated and whisked to the Harter Veterinary Medical Center for an emergency C-section. The fragile infant, named Joanne, stayed at the veterinary hospital for round-the-clock care. Due to the long labor, Joanne was having trouble breathing, and it turned out that she had a collapsed lung and pneumonia. Twelve days later, the baby was laid down in a nest of soft hay in the gorilla bedroom, and Imani was let in. The moment Joanne was reunited with her mother will forever live in our hearts. This gorilla’s story was (and still is) incredible.

5. Cheetah and puppy best friends.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Ruuxa and Raina

Ruuxa and Raina became an overnight sensation. The six-week-old cheetah cub and seven-week-old Rhodesian ridgeback were the youngest animal ambassador pairing since the program began. Shortly after their introduction, Ruuxa underwent surgery to repair a growth abnormality in his limbs. Raina, whose name means guardian, stayed by the cheetah cub’s side throughout the procedure and continues to be an attentive and loyal friend.

6. Jackson, the curious okapi calf.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Jackson

Gestation for okapis can last from 14 to 16 months, so the birth of Jackson in July was a highly anticipated event. The curious calf stayed close to his mother but kicked his way into our hearts as well.

7. A rare crane chick.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Wattled crane chick

Our very first wattled crane chick shuffled its way into our hearts this summer. Wattled cranes are the rarest crane species found in Africa, so this chick was (and still is) a treasure.

8. Our first Masai giraffe calves.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Gowon

We have a total of 134 Ugandan giraffes and 23 reticulated giraffes, but the births of Gowon and Kamau in July marked the first time Masai giraffes have been born at the Safari Park. While Masai giraffes are the most populous of the subspecies, all wild populations have decreased significantly since the late 1990s, due to habitat loss and competition with livestock for resources. Both are aptly named in the Masai language: Gowon (pronounced Go-wan) means maker of rain and Kamau (pronounced Kam-mao) means little warrior.

9. Four reasons to roar at Lion Camp.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: 4 African lion cubs

Four little rascals debuted at Lion Camp this fall and almost doubled the size of our pride. Cubs Ernest, Evelyn, Marion, and Miss Ellen were born on June 22 but spent several months bonding with their mother, Oshana, behind the scenes. The cubs now spend their days pouncing, climbing, and testing the patience of their big cat parents.

10. Our spotted cheetah sisters.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Cheetah sisters

Ayanna and Bahati received around-the-clock care at our Animal Care Center for the past few months. The cubs were born at the Safari Park’s Cheetah Breeding Center to Allie, but animal care staff decided to hand-rear the females because their mother has been unsuccessful with previous litters. Now, the female cubs have advanced in their training and have moved to different areas of the Park, awaiting their puppy companions.

11. Luke, a leucistic waterbuck calf.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Luke

Luke has been turning heads since his arrival in September. For decades, we’ve successfully bred over 20,000 rare and endangered animals, including 278 ellipsen waterbuck, but Luke is the first-ever animal born at the Park with a condition that causes him to have reduced pigmentation. He’s a stand-out guy and receives a lot of attention from guests taking a ride on the Africa Tram.

12. Petunia, the petite rhino.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Petunia

Our 67th greater one-horned rhino, named Petunia, debuted in the Asian Plains exhibit after one month of close care. The calf weighed only 128 pounds (58 kilograms) at birth, which is small for her species, so animal care staff kept a 24-hour watch on the newborn until she was ready to leave her protected yard in September. Petunia and her mother, Tanaya, have been blooming and exploring their 40-acre (16 hectares) home since.

13. Satellite elephant calf Nandi.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: Nandi

Did you hear? Our satellite herd at the Reid Park Zoo in Tuscon, Arizona, got an adorable little boost with big ears this year. The African elephant calf named Nandi is doing well and enjoying time with her herd at the Click Family Elephant Care Center.

14. Four purr-fect cheetah cubs.

14 Notable Safari Park Births of 2014: 4 cheetah cubs

photo: Ershun Lee

Four adorable cheetah cubs were born to first-time mother Addison in July at our off-site breeding center. Wgasa, Reu, Pumzika, Mahala, and their mother moved into the Okvango Outpost (and our hearts) last month. It’s certainly wonderful to see so many spots and to watch a cheetah mother raising her cubs.

 

Jenn Beening is the social media specialist for San Diego Zoo Global. Read her previous post, 10 Festive Reindeer Facts.