14 Adorable Baby Animal Facts

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Because we can all use a daily dose of cute…

1. A newborn koala joey is only about the size of a large jelly bean, and it can’t even see or hear.

A newborn koala joey is only about the size of a large jelly bean, and it can't even see or hear. | 14 Cute Baby Animal Facts

2. Some monkey species give birth to babies that are a completely different color. For example, langur babies are orange while their parents are black.

Some monkey species give birth to babies that are a completely different color. For example, langur babies are orange while their parents are black. | 14 Cute Baby Animal Facts

3. Female lions living in a pride often give birth around the same time, which makes for lots of playmates.

Female lions living in a pride often give birth around the same time, which makes for lots of playmates. | 14 Cute Baby Animal Facts

4. Orangutan youngsters stay with their mothers until they’re seven or eight years old and fully weaned, the longest childhood of the great apes.

Orangutan youngsters stay with their mothers until they’re seven or eight years old and fully weaned, the longest childhood of the great apes. | 14 Cute Baby Animal Facts

5. At hatching, a flamingo chick has gray down feathers and is the size of a tennis ball.

At hatching, a flamingo chick has gray down feathers and is the size of a tennis ball. | 14 Cute Baby Animal Facts

6. Meerkats form “babysitter clubs” and share the duty of raising pups—and teaching them how to hide, hunt, clean, and defend all that is theirs.

Meerkats form "babysitter clubs" and share the duty of raising pups and teaching them how to hide, hunt, clean, and defend all that is theirs. | 14 Cute Baby Animal Facts

7. A giraffe calf can stand up and walk within an hour of its birth.

A giraffe calf can stand up and walk within an hour of its birth. | 14 Cute Baby Animal Facts

8. Bonobos use touch to give reassurance and comfort to each other. They form close relationships with other members of the troop, even after they are grown.

Bonobos use touch to give reassurance and comfort to each other. They form close relationships with other members of the troop, even after they are grown. | 14 Cute Baby Animal Facts

9. Okapi calves triple their size by the end of their second month, but do not reach full adult size until three years of age.

Okapi calves triple their size by the end of their second month but do not reach full adult size until three years of age. | 14 Cute Baby Animal Facts

10. Male jaguar cubs grow more quickly than females—and by about two years old, males are about 50 percent heavier.

Male jaguar cubs grow more quickly than females and by about two years old are about 50% heavier. | 14 Cute Baby Animal Facts

11. Elephant calves spend their days practicing making all four legs go in the same direction at the same time, perfecting their ear flaring, and mastering trunk control.

Elephant calves spend their days practicing making all four legs go in the same direction at the same time, perfecting their ear flaring, and mastering trunk control. | 14 Cute Baby Animal Facts

12. Young Panamanian golden frogs are much more secretive than the fully toxic adult, hiding until they can protect themselves with their skin secretions.

Young Panamanian golden frogs are much more secretive than the fully toxic adult, hiding until they can protect themselves with their skin secretions. | 14 Cute Baby Animal Facts

13. Rhino calves start growing their iconic horns when they are four to five months old.

Rhino calves start growing their iconic horns when they reach 4-5 months. | 14 Cute Baby Animal Facts

14. Giant pandas are only about the size of a stick of butter at birth, and they’re hairless and helpless.

Giant pandas are only about the size of a stick of butter at birth, and they're hairless and helpless. | 14 Cute Baby Animal Facts

Which baby animal are you? Take the QUIZ and automatically be entered to win a family excursion to the San Diego Zoo or Safari Park.

 

Jenn Beening is the social media planner for San Diego Zoo Global. Read her previous post, How to Grow a Water-Smart Landscape.

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